Conclusion: Zisserman, and Cv. Jawahar, “Cats and dogs,” in

Conclusion:

The findings of our work
contribute to conservation of elephant issues and solutions to human elephant
conflict. We recommend the usage of real time system to identify individual
animals or group of animals approaching the human habitats. This study provides
insights to safeguard the animals from human activities and reduces the work
pressure for the forest officials. Our model overcomes the drawbacks of the
existing system. Location detection and humidity detection along with animal
detection is done. Our system can be deployed at forest borders, tea estates, food
plantation, water holes, migration routes etc. for elephant monitoring and
detection. Human-animal collision can be reduced to a greater extent. Our
system also focuses on conservation of rare species. Humidity can also to
monitored and notified. Traditional observation can be less effective.
Therefore, automated systems are being used. The real time automated approach
minimizes manual work and is more efficient and reliable when compared to all
existing systems. Thus, not only monitoring and detecting, prediction of future
is also possible in Internet of Things (IoT).

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