Debate Board of Education.”). Similarly, the court leaned to

Debate over African American civil rights ties back to centuries before, eventually separating America between the North and South over views on slavery; this long-lasting predicament eventually would come to an end through the Civil War (1861-1865). The abolishment of slavery, also known as the thirteenth amendment, would mark the beginning of African American civil rights. As these rights would continue to grow, forms of government would attempt to limit these rights given at birth; Jim Crow laws enforced legal segregation within the South. From the late 1800s through the 1950s, the Supreme Court on African American civil rights court cases have illustrated loose interpretation of the Constitution in Brown v. Board of Education, loose interpretation of the Constitution in Plessy v. Ferguson, and strict interpretation of the Constitution in Shelley v. Kraemer.The first example is from the Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education, which represents a court that was a loose interpretation of the Constitution. Chief Justice Warren of the Supreme Court, decided that the actions by segregated schools was violating the equal protection guaranteed by the 14th amendment. (“Brown v. Board of Education.”). This case is an example of a loose court because the decision was not directly quoted within the Constitution itself. (“Brown v. Board of Education.”). Similarly, the court leaned to a looser interpretation of the Constitution in their decision because it was in fact implied from the 14th amendment. (“Brown v. Board of Education.”). This case exemplifies the court at a time when it was loose on African American civil rights.When considering all possible options, a counter argument for the case Brown v. Board of Education would be a strict interpretation of the Constitution; of the two options, a loose interpretation is the better option for societal benefit. The dissenting argument of the case was the belief that the board of education, in fact, had not violated the equal protection guaranteed by the 14th amendment. If the Supreme Court had taken a stricter approach the decision would have impacted the successfulness of future African Americans within their pursuance of an education. Wolf, Richard. (“The 21 Most Famous Supreme Court Decisions.”). The loose interpretation of the Constitution in this case would have been better for society because their decision would disband segregated schools. (“Brown v. Board of Education.”). Overall, while this case may have impacted society in a positive way, the following case continues to disband segregation within the system of education.The next example is from the Supreme Court case Plessy v. Ferguson, which represents a court that was a loose interpretation of the Constitution. Chief Justice Henry Billings Brown of the Supreme Court, decided that segregation itself does not constitute unlawful discrimination. (“Important Supreme Court Cases for Civil Rights.”). This case is an example of a loose court because their defense is reliant on what the constitution does not say, not what it is stated. (“Important Supreme Court Cases for Civil Rights.”). Similarly, the court leaned to a looser interpretation of the Constitution in their decision because as Brown stated, “in the nature of things it could not have been intended to abolish distinctions based upon color, or to enforce social, as distinguished from political equality, or a commingling of the two races unsatisfactory to either.” (“Important Supreme Court Cases for Civil Rights.”). This case exemplifies the court at a time when it was loose on African American civil rights.When considering all possible options, a counter argument for the case Plessy v. Ferguson, would be the strict interpretation of the Constitution; of the two options, a strict interpretation is the better option for societal benefit. The dissenting argument of the case was that, “separate but equal”, was an unlawful form of unlawful discrimination. (“Plessy v. Ferguson.”). If the Supreme Court had taken a stricter approach, the decision would have been beneficial towards the unity between white and colored people. (Plessy v. Ferguson.”). The strict interpretation of the Constitution in this case would have been better for society because the loose interpretation provided defense for discrimination against African Americans . (“Important Supreme Court Cases for Civil Rights.”). Overall, while this case may have impacted society in a negative way, the following case would end following the supreme court case Brown v. Board of Education.The last example is from the Supreme Court case Shelley v. Kraemer, which represents a court that was a strict interpretation of the Constitution. Chief Justice Fred Moore Vinson of the Supreme Court, decided although such covenants can be created, they cannot be forced by federal law, as defended by the fourteenth amendment. (“Shelley v. Kraemer, 334 U.S. 1 (1948).”). This case is an example of a strict court because the decision is quoted through the fourteenth amendment and its “guaranteed equal protection.” (“Shelley v. Kraemer, 334 U.S. 1 (1948).”). Similarly, the court leaned to a stricter interpretation of the Constitution in their decision because they cited directly in defense for their decision. (“Shelley v. Kraemer, 334 U.S. 1 (1948).”) This case exemplifies the court at a time when it was strict on African American civil rights.When considering all possible options, a counter argument for the case Shelley v. Kraemer would be the loose interpretation of the Constitution; of the two options, a strict interpretation is the better option for societal benefit. The dissenting argument of the case was that covenants are not in violation of citizens’ fourteenth amendment because color was never quoted, so therefore cannot be implied. (“Shelley v. Kraemer.”). If the Supreme Court had taken a more loose approach, the decision would have further allowed the enforcement of covenants. (“Shelley v. Kraemer.”). The strict interpretation of the Constitution in this case would have been better for society because it benefits the people, but a strict interpretation left it to the extent where covenants were not allowed to be enforced by federal law. (“Shelley v. Kraemer.”). Overall, while this case may have impacted society in somewhat of a positive way, the following case showed a change in the court from the beginning of limitations on African American rights, such as the Jim Crow laws.Throughout the late nineteenth century, and mid-twentieth century, the Supreme Court on African American civil rights court cases have illustrated loose interpretations of the Constitution, such as in Brown v. Board of Education and Plessy v. Ferguson, yet strict interpretations of the Constitution as well, such as in Shelley v. Kraemer. Both loose and strict interpretations have contributed to the expansion of African American civil rights within US History. As a result, all African Americans of today have benefitted from the removal of legal segregation, slavery, and covenants denying them from their own equal protection; these supreme court cases exemplify moments where our society has depended on decisions from the past, and such decisions that will continue to contribute to the future.